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The Inflation Reduction Act includes tax credits for residential solar and battery storage systems, along with other measures aimed at encouraging individuals to cut their carbon emissions. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

3 ways the Inflation Reduction Act would pay you to help fight climate change

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The wild ponies roam on South Ocean Beach at Assateague Island. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

A fossilized tooth may help solve the mystery of the Chincoteague ponies

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Patricia Neves (left) and Ana Paula Ano Bom helped launch a global project to revolutionize access to mRNA technology. Ian Cheibub for NPR hide caption

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Ian Cheibub for NPR

A Russian serviceman patrols Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Station on May 1. A series of exchanges in recent weeks has made conditions at the plant more dangerous. Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images

In this 30 second exposure, a meteor streaks across the sky during the annual Perseid meteor shower, Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2021, in Spruce Knob, West Virginia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls) NASA/Bill Ingalls/(NASA/Bill Ingalls) hide caption

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NASA/Bill Ingalls/(NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Twinkle, Twinkle, Shooting Star

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This iamge provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) shows a colorized transmission electron micrograph of monkeypox particles (orange) found within an infected cell (brown), cultured in the laboratory. NIAID via AP hide caption

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NIAID via AP

How Monkeypox Became A Public Health Emergency

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Photo illustration: Getty Images/Vanessa Leroy/NPR

Carry The Two: Making Audio Magic With Math

Math is a complex, beautiful language that can help us understand the world. And sometimes ... math is also hard! Science communicator Sadie Witkowski says the key to making math your friend is to foster your own curiosity. That's the guiding principle behind her new podcast, Carry the Two. It's also today's show: Embracing all math has to offer without the fear of failure.

Carry The Two: Making Audio Magic With Math

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A self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover on Vera Rubin Ridge. AP hide caption

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AP

What a decade of Curiosity has taught us about life on Mars

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A researcher holds a Northern long eared bat in Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. Nick Kalen / Virginia Tech hide caption

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Nick Kalen / Virginia Tech

A Tale Of Two Parks And The Bats Within Them

Buckle up! Short Wave is going on a road trip every Friday this summer. In this first episode of our series on the research happening in the National Parks System, we head to Shenandoah National Park and the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge. Some bats there are faring better than others against white-nose syndrome, a fungus that has killed more than 7 million bats in the last decade. Today — what researchers like Jesse De La Cruz think is enabling some bat species to survive.

A Tale Of Two Parks And The Bats Within Them

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Elizabeth and James Weller at their home in Houston two months after losing their baby due to a premature rupture of membranes. Elizabeth could not receive the medical care she needed until several days later because of a Texas law that banned abortion after six weeks. Julia Robinson/NPR hide caption

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Julia Robinson/NPR

Abortion Laws in Texas are Disrupting Maternal Care

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A conceptual illustration of a double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule with mutation in a gene. Kateryna Kon/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

A band of wild horses on a mountainside near the Soda Mountain Wilderness area. Photo Courtesy of: Wild Horse Fire Brigade - a non-profit organization hide caption

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Photo Courtesy of: Wild Horse Fire Brigade - a non-profit organization

Wild Horses Could Keep Wildfire At Bay

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A couple abandons their home flooded by the waters of the North Fork Kentucky River in Jackson, Kentucky on July 28, 2022. LEANDRO LOZADA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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LEANDRO LOZADA/AFP via Getty Images

Why We Will See More Devastating Floods Like The Ones In Kentucky

Dee Davis remembers watching his grandmother float by in a canoe during the 1957 flood that hit Whitesburg, Ky. The water crested at nearly 15 feet back then--a record that stood for over half a century, until it was obliterated last week.

Why We Will See More Devastating Floods Like The Ones In Kentucky

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twomeows/Getty Images

An illustration of Qikiqtania wakei (center) in the water with its larger cousin, Tiktaalik roseae. Alex Boersma hide caption

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Alex Boersma

This fish evolved to walk on land — then said 'nope' and went back to the water

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