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Mayor Eric Adams speaks during a graduation ceremony at Madison Square Garden in July in New York. Adams is critical of Texas Gov. Greg Abbott as he sends busloads of migrants from Texas to New York City. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Tomeka Kimbrough-Hilson was diagnosed with uterine fibroids in 2006 and underwent surgery to remove a non-cancerous mass. When she started experiencing symptoms again in 2020, she was unable to get an appointment with a gynecologist. Her experience was not uncommon, according to a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Nicole Buchanan for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Buchanan for NPR

A 'staggering' number of people couldn't get care during the pandemic, poll finds

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Carlie Brown (left) and Molly Pela exchange wedding vows as their friend, Julie Takahashi, officiates the ceremony. Both women said they rushed to get married after reading Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas' concurring opinion in striking down Roe v. Wade, in which he suggested also overturning the landmark case that legalized same-sex marriage. Carlie A. Brown hide caption

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Carlie A. Brown

This poster released Aug 7, 2022, by the Albuquerque Police Department shows a vehicle suspected of being used as a conveyance in the recent homicides of four Muslim men in Albuquerque, N.M. AP hide caption

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AP

This 2019 image provided by the FBI shows Stephen Marlow, a suspect wanted in Ohio in the shooting deaths of four people, including a teenage girl, who has been arrested in Kansas, authorities said. AP hide caption

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AP

Dominique Claseman stands in front of the memorial he built for his Eagle Scouts project. Mark Jurgensen hide caption

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Mark Jurgensen

His hometown didn't have a veterans memorial, so this teen built one himself

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Miguel Peña and Juan Carlos Allende, Los Macorinos. Photo by Alejandra Barragán. Alejandra Barragán hide caption

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Alejandra Barragán

Los Macorinos, the unsung heroes of Latin and Mexican music

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Encore: Chippewa Tribe members in Minnesota consider end of tribal blood rule

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Steve Cline [left], Chris Cook, and Annette Cline meet for the first time. SDFD Communications Department/Mónica Muñoz hide caption

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SDFD Communications Department/Mónica Muñoz

Steve's heart stopped five times. Quick thinking by his wife helped saved his life

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This handout image shows a Marine passing out water to evacuees during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 22. U.S. Central Command Public Affairs hide caption

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U.S. Central Command Public Affairs

A former Marine details the chaotic exit from Afghanistan — and how we should mark it

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A jury has ordered conspiracy theorist Alex Jones to pay millions of dollars for spreading lies about the Sandy Hook school massacre. But his influence in right-wing media and politics remains strong. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

How Alex Jones helped mainstream conspiracy theories become part of American life

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Abortion-rights protesters fill Indiana Statehouse corridors and cheer outside legislative chambers on Friday as lawmakers vote to concur on a near-total abortion ban, in Indianapolis. Arleigh Rodgers/AP hide caption

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Arleigh Rodgers/AP