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Only when the caller cannot or will not collaborate on a safety plan and the counselor feels the caller will harm themselves imminently should emergency services be called, according to the hotline's policy. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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Dr. Nicole Scott, the residency program director at Indiana's largest teaching hospital, is worried what the near-total ban on abortion in the state means for her hospital's ability to recruit and retain the best doctors. Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Farah Yousry/Side Effects Public Media

The monkeypox outbreak is growing in the U.S. and vaccines remain in short supply. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

With supplies low, FDA authorizes plan to stretch limited monkeypox vaccine doses

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Research shows that expanded access to preventive care and coverage has led to an increase in colon cancer screenings, vaccinations, use of contraception and chronic disease screenings. Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Ngampol Thongsai/Getty Images/EyeEm

Tomeka Kimbrough-Hilson was diagnosed with uterine fibroids in 2006 and underwent surgery to remove a non-cancerous mass. When she started experiencing symptoms again in 2020, she was unable to get an appointment with a gynecologist. Her experience was not uncommon, according to a new poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Nicole Buchanan for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Buchanan for NPR

A 'staggering' number of people couldn't get care during the pandemic, poll finds

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Demonstrators outside PhRMA headquarters in Washington, D.C., protest lobbying by pharmaceutical companies to keep Medicare from negotiating lower prescription drug prices. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

People bring bags of drugs into Tapestry Health's office if they suspect the drugs contain xylazine, a sedative that is starting to permeate illegal opioids and cocaine. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

An animal tranquilizer is making street drugs even more dangerous

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An emergency declaration frees up resources to help fight the monkeypox outbreak. There are currently more than 6,600 cases in the U.S. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A woman cools off at a fountain at the Sforza Castle in Milan, Italy, on July 13. You can do a lot to look out for those who are at higher risk of heat-related illness. Luca Bruno/AP hide caption

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Luca Bruno/AP

A team of volunteers with an Ohio-based nonprofit handed out 2,500 doses of a nasal spray version of naloxone, an overdose reversal drug, at this year's Bonnaroo music festival. Amy Harris/Invision via AP hide caption

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Amy Harris/Invision via AP

A bag of assorted pills and prescription drugs is dropped off for disposal during the Drug Enforcement Administration's National Prescription Drug Take Back Day on April 24, 2021 in Los Angeles. Patrick T. Falon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Falon/AFP via Getty Images

New book chronicles how America's opioid industry operated like a drug cartel

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Air Force service members run a timed 1.5 miles during their annual physical fitness test at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois in June. The U.S. Space Force intends to do away with once-a-year assessments in favor of wearable technology. Eric Schmid/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Eric Schmid/St. Louis Public Radio

Tennessee's Medicaid program, TennCare, dropped Katie Lester and her son Mason (right), because of a clerical error in 2019. The Lester family was left uninsured for most of the next three years, including during the birth of youngest child Memphis (left). Brett Kelman/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Brett Kelman/Kaiser Health News

Vintage and new items from discount stores may contain lead and can be especially dangerous for children, who often put their hands in their mouths after touching anything within reach. Brian Munoz and Samantha Horton/Midwest Newsroom hide caption

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Brian Munoz and Samantha Horton/Midwest Newsroom

Scientists say research into Alzheimer's needs to take a broader view of how the disease affects the brain — whether that's changes in the cortex or the role of inflammation. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Alzheimer's researchers are looking beyond plaques and tangles for new treatments

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Kyle Planck, who has recovered from a painful case of monkeypox, has joined advocacy groups and pleaded with elected officials to make the antiviral pills TPOXX more available. Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AFP via Getty Images

Getting monkeypox treatment is easier, but still daunting and confusing

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Delta-8 products are set for testing at Virginia Commonwealth University's forensic science lab. These products come in different forms and packaging, many of which are designed to look like candies or cereal. Crixell Matthews/VPM News hide caption

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Crixell Matthews/VPM News

States look to regulate weed alternatives like delta-8 as sales explode

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Dani Marietti's "sterilization shower" in Helena, Montana, features cookies with abortion-rights slogans, such as "My Body, My Choice," written on them in frosting. Ellis Juhlin/Yellowstone Public Radio hide caption

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Ellis Juhlin/Yellowstone Public Radio

More people are opting to get sterilized — and some are being turned away

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The Biden administration plans to offer updated booster shots in the fall. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Summer boosters for people under 50 shelved in favor of updated boosters in the fall

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A box of Evusheld, an antibody therapy developed by pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca for the prevention of COVID-19 in immunocompromised patients, is seen in February at the AstraZeneca facility for biological medicines in Sweden Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images

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